Know Your Stuff | UCAS

We are the organisation responsible for managing applications to higher education courses in the UK. Not only do we process more than two million applications for full-time undergraduate courses every year, but we help students to find the right course. We try to make things run as smoothly as possible by providing innovative online tools which make it easier for students and higher education institutions (HEIs) to manage applications and offers.

We provide application services across a range of subject areas and modes of study for UK universities and colleges. More than half a million people wanting to study at a university or college use our services each year. Our specialist services, the Graduate Teacher Training Registry (GTTR), the UK Postgraduate Application and Statistical Service (UKPASS) and the Conservatoires UK Admissions Service (CUKAS) are used by more than 50,000 people every year.

We aim to help students make informed choices about higher education, guiding them, their parents and advisers through the application process.

We carry out research, consultancy and advisory work for schools, colleges, careers services, professional bodies and employers. We also offer continuing professional development tailored to meet the needs of individual institutions or subject areas. This ensures a long-term commitment to improving admissions processes across the industry.

 

Source: www.ucas.ac.uk/about_us/whoweare/

 

British Slang | ‘E’ and ‘F’

FROM http://www.effingpot.com/slang.shtml

Easy Peasy – A childish term for something very easy. You might say it’s a snap.

Engaged – When you ring someone and they are already on the phone you will get the engaged tone. In other words, they will be engaged. You would say you get the busy signal or the line is busy.

Excuse me – This is a great one! It’s what kids are taught to say when they belch in public. We are also taught to say “pardon me” if we fart out loud. Unfortunately in American “excuse me” means you are encroaching in someone’s personal space and you say “pardon me” when you don’t hear someone properly. Imagine our surprise when we discovered that actually Americans are not belching and farting all the time.

Faff – To faff is to dither or to fanny around. If we procrastinated when getting ready for bed, as kids, our Dad use tell us we were faffing around.

Fagged – If you are too lazy or tired to do something you could say “I can’t be fagged”. It means you can’t be Bothered.

Fagging – Fagging is the practice of making new boys at boarding schools into slaves for the older boys. If you are fagging for an older boy you might find yourself running his bath, cleaning his shoes or performing more undesirable tasks.

Fancy – If you fancy something then it means you desire it. There are two basic forms in common use – food and people. If you fancy a cake for example it means you like the look of it and you want to eat it. If you see someone of (hopefully) the opposite sex then you might fancy them if you liked the look of them and wanted to get to know them a little better!!!

Fanny – This is the word for a woman’s front bits! One doesn’t normally talk about anyone’s fanny as it is a bit rude. You certainly don’t have a fanny pack, or smack people on their fannys – you would get arrested for that! Careful use of this word in the UK is advised!

Fanny around – I’m always telling people to stop fannying around and get on with it. It means to procrastinate. Drives me mad!

Fiddle sticks – I have an old Aunt who is much too well mannered to swear. So when the need arises for a swear word, she will substitute “fiddle sticks”.

Filch – To filch is to steal or pilfer. The origin is apparently unknown.

Fit – Fit is a word that I have heard a lot recently – it seems to be making a comeback. A fit bird means a girl who is pretty good looking or tasty! A fit bloke would be the male equivalent.

Flog – To Flog something is to sell it. It also means to beat something with a whip, but when your wife tells you she flogged the old TV it is more likely she has sold it than beaten it (hopefully!).

Fluke – If something great happened to you by chance that would be a fluke. When I was a kid my Mum lost her engagement ring on the beach and only realised half way home. We went back to the spot and she found it in the sand. That was a fluke.

Flutter – I like to have a flutter on the horses. It means to have a bet, usually a small one by someone who is not a serious gambler.

FortnightTwo weeks. Comes from an abbreviation of “fourteen nights”. Hence terms like “I’m off for a fortnights holiday” meaning “I am going on a two week vacation”.

Fruity – If someone is feeling fruity then they are feeling frisky. Watch out!

Full monty – Since the movie has come out of the same name I have heard some odd Texan descriptions of what the full monty means. It really has nothing to do with taking your clothes off. It just means the whole thing or going the whole way. That’s it. Clearly when applied to stripping it means not stopping at your underwear! The origins of the expression are still under discussion. There are many theories but no conclusive evidence at the moment.

Full of beans – This means to have loads of energy. It is a polite way of saying that a child is a maniac. I was often described as being full of beans as a kid and now it is my wife’s way of telling me to keep still when she is trying to get to sleep. Strangely the same expression in some parts of the US means that you are exaggerating or talking bollocks!

Fashion | Very.co.uk

The Very Style Experts are here to show you how. They want you to wave goodbye to nothing-to-wear days forever, so you can look and feel fashion forward – whatever you’re up to.

They’ll define the ‘style staples’ in your wardrobe (like your maxi and denim shorts), and show you how to style them for this season’s hottest trends.

However you feel about your wardrobe now, you’ll love it with Very!

Very are giving you £10* off your first credit order of £25 or more when you enter 25CWB at the checkout.

Very launched on 5th July 2009 and was the first Shop Direct brand to utilise social media.

Designed with internet savvy customers in mind, the website gives customers the opportunity to shop across a variety of product areas, from fashion and footwear to home and electrical there really is something for everyone.

Very offers stylish clothing from a wide range of designers and celebrities including Holly Willoughby, Fearne Cotton, Steve Jones, Jasmine Guinness and Diana Vickers to name just a few.

Very talks to its’ customers via a variety of innovative social media marketing tools including facebook, twitter, VBlog and an interactive online magazine, VStyle, which are full of fashion tips and style advice. Very also uses paper to showcase their product ranges and to inspire customers by bringing them the latest looks direct from the catwalk, the must-have brands and special offers.

It’s easy to shop online by simply clicking Very Clothing 24 hours a day, or by calling 08448 222 321, 7 a.m. – 11 p.m., 7 days a week, 365 days a year.

Sources: very.co.uk

Telly for Anglophiles | League of Gentlemen

[abridged from http://www.leagueofgentlemen.co.uk/]

The League of gentlemen are: Jeremy Dyson, Steve Pemberton, Mark Gatiss and Reece Shearsmith.

BBC 2 aired the first episode of The League of Gentlemen ‘Welcome to Royston Vasey’ on 11th January 1999.

Over ten years later, we have had a second and a third series, a Christmas special, loads of books, two national tours with the ‘local show for local people’ and ‘The League of Gentlemen Are Behind You’ and many individual projects such as TLC, Surrealissimo, nighty night, Benidorm, Dr Who, Catterick, Sherlock and film appearances in Birthday Girl and Hitchhikers Guide to name just a few. Reece has taken to the boards a few times and has appeared in the stage version of The Producers. Steve has become a regular on TV in Benidorm and has appeared in many quality drama and Mark has fulfilled a lifetime ambition not by just writing an episode of Doctor Who but by starring in an episode! Jeremy has published more books, co-written a brilliant TV series, Blackpool and co written the amazing stage show Ghost Stories with Andy Nyman and has too many projects on the go to mention them all!

Collectively they Fulfilled a lifetime ambition with their very own feature film entitled The League of Gentlemens Apocalypse which is out on DVD and a DVD of the Panto tour is out also! Steve and Reece won A Comedy Award with the first series of Psychoville and have a 2nd series under their belt which is also nominated for a comedy award! Can we beg them for a live show of Psychoville?

Psychoville was launched in June 2009 and features both Steve and Reece supported by an amazing cast including Dawn French, Christopher Biggins, Dame Eileen Atkins and Nicholas Le Prevost to name but a few!

Etsy Finds | The Tube Edition

As usual, just click on the links to gain full access to the Etsy store!

London Tube Map Day Handbag and Clutch In OneLondon Underground Subway Poster, 1924 - 8.5x11 Poster Print - also available in 13x19 - see listing detailsEarrings - MIND The GAP - London Underground Warning For Train Passengers

London Bridge iPad Case, Gents iPad Cover, SleeveVintage London Underground Railways Map Brass Cuff Bracelet - Map Jewelry

 

Discover London | Ronnie Scott’s Jazz Club

Ronnie Scott’s Jazz Club is a jazz club which has operated in London since 1959.

The club opened on 30 October 1959 in a basement at 39 Gerrard Street in London’s Soho district. It was managed by musicians Ronnie Scott and Pete King. In 1965 it moved to a larger venue nearby at 47 Frith Street. The original venue continued in operation as the “Old Place” until the lease ran out in 1967, and was used for performances by the up-and-coming generation of musicians.

Zoot Sims was the club’s first transatlantic visitor in 1962, and was succeeded by many others (often saxophonists whom Scott and King, tenor saxophonists themselves, admired, such as Johnny Griffin, Lee Konitz, Sonny Rollins, Sonny Stitt) in the years that followed. Many UK jazz musicians were also regularly featured, including Tubby Hayes and Dick Morrissey who would both drop in for jam sessions with the visiting stars. In the mid-1960s, Ernest Ranglin was the house guitarist. The club’s house pianist until 1967 was Stan Tracey. For nearly 30 years it was home of a Christmas residency to George Melly and John Chilton’s Feetwarmers. In early 1969, The Who premiered Pete Townshend’s rock opera “Tommy” at the club. It was the site of Jimi Hendrix’s last live performance.

Scott regularly acted as the club’s Master of Ceremonies, and was (in)famous for his repertoire of jokes, asides and one-liners. After Scott’s death, King continued to run the club for a further nine years, before selling the club to theatre impresario Sally Greene in June 2005.

In 2009 Ronnie Scott’s was named by the Brecon Jazz Festival as one of 12 venues which had made the most important contributions to jazz music in the United Kingdom, and finished third in the voting for the initial award.

British Celebrity Spotlight | Rupert Penry-Jones

Penry-Jones was born in London in 1970 to Welsh actor Peter Penry-Jones, and actress Angela Thorne. His brother Laurence Penry-Jones and sister-in-law Polly Walker are also actors.

He was educated at Dulwich College in south-east London, until age 17 when he was enrolled at Bristol Old Vic, only to be expelled in his second year for being a bad influence.. His bad influence was a result of a broken relationship in which Rupert stated he tried to get over it by “shagging everything in sight” . Being dyslexic, he struggled at school, eventually leaving with no A-levels.

In 1995 he appeared with his mother on television in Cold Comfort Farm.

Penry-Jones trained for the stage at the Bristol Old Vic Theatre School. He made his London stage debut at the Hackney Empire in 1995 playing Fortinbras to Ralph Fiennes’s Hamlet in an Almeida production of Hamlet.

He was cast as Richard in the premiere staging of Stephen Poliakoff’s Sweet Panic at Hampstead Theatre in 1996. The following year he appeared in both The Paper Husband at Hampstead Theatre and as the upper class Pip Thompson in a prestigious revival of Arnold Wesker’s Chips with Everything on the Lyttelton stage at the Royal National Theatre.

In 1998 he created the role of the Boy in Edward Albee’s The Play About the Baby at the Almeida Theatre. In 1999 he joined the RSC at Stratford-upon-Avon, playing the title role in Don Carlos at The Other Place and Alcibiades in Timon of Athens at the Royal Shakespeare Theatre. Both productions transferred to the Barbican Centre in 2000, where his performance as Don Carlos won the Ian Charleson Award.

At the West Yorkshire Playhouse, Leeds in 2001 he was cast as Robert Caplan in J. B. Priestley’s thriller “time-play” Dangerous Corner opposite Dervla Kirwan, who played Olwen Peel. The production then successfully transferred for a four-month run at the Garrick Theatre in London’s West End.

From July to October 2003 at the National’s Cottesloe Theatre he played the leading role of Louis XIV in Nick Dear’s historical drama Power.

He returned to the theatre at the end of 2009 playing the role of Carl in Michael Wynne’s new play The Priory at the Royal Court Theatre, London, from 19 November 2009 to 16 January 2010.

On television, he has played barrister Alex Hay in C4’s 10 part serial North Square in 2000, Donald McLean in the BBC’s 4-part production of Cambridge Spies in 2003 and Grimani in Russell T. Davies’ production of Casanova in 2005.

In 2004, he joined the cast in series 3 of the BBC’s BAFTA-winning series Spooks. He played the lead role of section leader, Adam Carter for 4 series before leaving the show in 2008. He won ITV3 Crime Thriller Awards for his role in Spooks in 2008. He also went on to play the role of Captain Wentworth in ITV’s adaptation of Persuasion.

In 2008, he starred with Bradley Whitford and Neve Campbell in Burn Up playing an oil executive who becomes embroiled in the politics surrounding global warming and oil stocks.

He played Richard Hannay in the BBC adaptation of The 39 Steps which was screened at Christmas 2008.

In 2009, he was cast as the lead in the unaired ABC pilot The Forgotten but was unceremoniously replaced when the pilot was picked up and replaced by Christian Slater. Penry-Jones was apparently devastated and proceeded to give a number of interviews in the UK in which he attacked the US television industry. His charms appear lost on Americans, however, with Rupert being unceremoniously dumped from a major TV series. He has since described American television as a “factory”.

In February 2009, he took the lead in an ITV drama, Whitechapel, a three-part thriller based on a the copycat killings of Jack the Ripper. Whitechapel was the highest performing new drama in 2009. A second series of the show based around the Kray twins was broadcast in autumn 2010; the third series began in January 2012.

He was scheduled to appear alongside other celebrities in Soccer Aid 2010, but broke a bone in his knee during training, putting him in a plaster cast and ruling him out of the final match on 6 June 2010.

Rupert was also recently cast opposite Maxine Peake in a legal drama Silk created by Peter Moffat. The show revolves around two barristers, played by Penry-Jones and Peake who are competing to become QCs.

Rupert also joined the cast of the film Manor Hunt Ball. Filming commenced in late 2010/early 2011.

Rupert is notable for being passed over for membership for the BAFTA, nevertheless he was a presenter at the BAFTA TV Awards in 2009 and 2012.

Rupert is known to be very critical of the British television and film industry. He stated that Doctor Who is a “very good children’s show…but has low production values.” He also said the Harry Potter films are “shit”. He admitted walking out of the first three films.

Hayley Merrick

Actor Benedict Cumberbatch has decided to make his opinion on period drama Downton Abbey quite clear, branding it “f**king atrocious”.

The Sherlock star, who is currently promoting BBC period drama Parade’s End, spoke to Reader’s Digest about the new series, before having a pop at Downton’s second season:

“We’re remembering that there was a world before the First World War. We’re living in a culture now that’s revering, or having a nostalgia trip with, the beginning of the 1900s.

“Although Downton traded a lot on the sentiment in the last series… but we won’t talk about that series because it was, in my opinion, f**king atrocious.”

When asked if he worried that Parade’s End would be seen as a similar type of programme to Downton, Cumberbatch, who plays the lead role of Christopher Tietjens in the show, answered:

“There was that fear, yes. I thought, ‘Are we pandering to a taste?’ But this…

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